The 4th Annual Institute for Disease Modeling Symposium was held on April 18th- 20th, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency in Bellevue, Washington. The overall focus of the 2016 Symposium was Disease Surveillance.

April 18th was dedicated to software training sessions focused upon using the EMOD model in a cloud HPC environment as well as a session dedicated to the Computational Modeling Platform Service (COMPS).

April 19th - 20th hosted the scientific sessions. There were general session talks, as well as a variety of topical breakout sessions ranging across malaria, other vector borne diseases, VPDs, typhoid, pneumonia and more, including software workshops.

The overall theme of the 2016 symposium was Disease Surveillance. To date, specialized surveillance networks have been created for polio, influenza, Ebola and other diseases but each of these networks have faced unique challenges that affect response capabilities. Talks at the symposium addressed how current disease surveillance approaches can be improved and how analysis can make better use of current data as well as exploring such questions as: What is the role for improvements in analytical and mathematical methods for surveillance planning, the collection of systematic disease surveillance data, and operational implementation of surveillance networks and diagnostic tools? How should disease surveillance be operationalized to guide elimination efforts? What is the current burden of various diseases and how will these patterns change in response to global health interventions?

Presentations for Download

Symposium 2016

The 4th Annual Institute for Disease Modeling Symposium was held on April 18th- 20th, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency in Bellevue, Washington. The overall focus of the 2016 Symposium was Disease Surveillance.

April 18th was dedicated to software training sessions focused upon using the EMOD model in a cloud HPC environment as well as a session dedicated to the Computational Modeling Platform Service (COMPS).

April 19th - 20th hosted the scientific sessions. There were general session talks, as well as a variety of topical breakout sessions ranging across malaria, other vector borne diseases, VPDs, typhoid, pneumonia and more, including software workshops.

The overall theme of the 2016 symposium was Disease Surveillance. To date, specialized surveillance networks have been created for polio, influenza, Ebola and other diseases but each of these networks have faced unique challenges that affect response capabilities. Talks at the symposium addressed how current disease surveillance approaches can be improved and how analysis can make better use of current data as well as exploring such questions as: What is the role for improvements in analytical and mathematical methods for surveillance planning, the collection of systematic disease surveillance data, and operational implementation of surveillance networks and diagnostic tools? How should disease surveillance be operationalized to guide elimination efforts? What is the current burden of various diseases and how will these patterns change in response to global health interventions?

Presentations Available for Download