Mike Famulare

Sr. Research Scientist

Mike Famulare

Sr. Research Scientist


Mike Famulare has a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Washington, Seattle, and a Bachelor of Science in Physics Education from New York University. His doctoral thesis was in Computational Neuroscience and focused on the mathematics and biophysics of single neuron information processing. Mike has a strong science education and community education focus and spent some time as a physics teacher at Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan, N.Y.C. before turning to research. Mike’s current research focuses on live polio vaccine transmission and genetic instability, polio immunity, molecular epidemiology, and transmission dynamics in heterogeneous populations.

Biography

Mike Famulare has a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Washington, Seattle, and a Bachelor of Science in Physics Education from New York University. His doctoral thesis was in Computational Neuroscience and focused on the mathematics and biophysics of single neuron information processing. Mike has a strong science education and community education focus and spent some time as a physics teacher at Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan, N.Y.C. before turning to research. Mike’s current research focuses on live polio vaccine transmission and genetic instability, polio immunity, molecular epidemiology, and transmission dynamics in heterogeneous populations.

Publications

Friday, September 8, 2017

We evaluated the global cessation of the type 2 oral polio vaccine by modeling pre- and post-cessation detection rates in order to identify anomalous detections that may indicate prolonged circulat

Read online
Wednesday, October 14, 2015
Outbreaks of cVDPV can occur due to the genetic instability of the OPV vaccine strains in populations that have low levels of immunity to poliovirus.
Read online
Friday, August 28, 2015
Nigeria may be the next country to achieve wild-type polio elimination. The most recent case of wild-type 1 (WPV1) in Nigeria occurred in July 2014.
Read online
Sunday, March 1, 2015
Widespread genetic sequencing of pathogens is changing the practice of epidemiology.
Read online