Kevin McCarthy

Sr. Research Scientist

Kevin McCarthy

Sr. Research Scientist


Kevin McCarthy has a Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as well as a Bachelor degree in both Physics and Electrical Engineering from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). While at MIT, Kevin was a member of the founding team of the MIT Entrepreneurship Review (MITER). He served as the managing editor to a team of 5 writers focusing on innovations in energy technology and “clean tech”, and as a member of the MITER executive board. Kevin’s doctoral research was performed as a member of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search collaboration which searches for interactions between atomic nuclei and a hypothetical dark matter particle termed the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). His doctoral thesis focused on two topics: a data analysis searching for candidate WIMP-nucleon interactions in CDMS’s silicon-based particle detectors, and the development and calibration of a computational package for simulating phonon and charge transport and readout in cryogenic (<50 mK) semiconductor particle detectors. Prior to his graduate work, Kevin’s research experience included work on diboson production at the Collider-Detector at Fermilab, study of the electrical properties of magnetically doped amorphous semiconductors, and an investigation of the potential for new physics searches at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). Kevin’s research at IDM focuses on calibration of a spatio-temporal disease model to describe endemic conditions in northern Nigeria, and calibration of the IDM intra-host malaria model. These calibrated models can be used to evaluate the expected efficacy of potential intervention campaigns and provide decision support to global health policymakers.

Biography

Kevin McCarthy has a Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as well as a Bachelor degree in both Physics and Electrical Engineering from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). While at MIT, Kevin was a member of the founding team of the MIT Entrepreneurship Review (MITER). He served as the managing editor to a team of 5 writers focusing on innovations in energy technology and “clean tech”, and as a member of the MITER executive board. Kevin’s doctoral research was performed as a member of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search collaboration which searches for interactions between atomic nuclei and a hypothetical dark matter particle termed the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). His doctoral thesis focused on two topics: a data analysis searching for candidate WIMP-nucleon interactions in CDMS’s silicon-based particle detectors, and the development and calibration of a computational package for simulating phonon and charge transport and readout in cryogenic (<50 mK) semiconductor particle detectors. Prior to his graduate work, Kevin’s research experience included work on diboson production at the Collider-Detector at Fermilab, study of the electrical properties of magnetically doped amorphous semiconductors, and an investigation of the potential for new physics searches at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO). Kevin’s research at IDM focuses on calibration of a spatio-temporal disease model to describe endemic conditions in northern Nigeria, and calibration of the IDM intra-host malaria model. These calibrated models can be used to evaluate the expected efficacy of potential intervention campaigns and provide decision support to global health policymakers.

Publications

Friday, September 8, 2017

We evaluated the global cessation of the type 2 oral polio vaccine by modeling pre- and post-cessation detection rates in order to identify anomalous detections that may indicate prolonged circulat

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Thursday, September 29, 2016

A spatial metapopulation model of wild poliovirus Type 1 transmission in Kano State, Nigeria is developed, calibrated to historical data, and projected into the future.

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Wednesday, June 3, 2015
Individuals with subpatent infections form a substantial portion of the infectious reservoir of malaria at all transmission intensities.
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Wednesday, January 7, 2015

A pre-erythrocytic vaccine could provide a useful tool for burden reduction and eventual eradication of malaria.

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