Caitlin Bever

Sr. Research Scientist

Caitlin Bever

Sr. Research Scientist


Caitlin Bever has a Ph.D. in Biological Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), along with a Bachelor’s degree (B.Sc.) with Combined Honors in Physics and Astronomy from the University of British Columbia (UBC). Caitlin received a Medtronic Fellowship for her post-graduate work at MIT and the Rudy Haering Medal for outstanding graduating physics student from UBC. Her academic research focused on understanding how to select useful predictions from uncertain mathematical models of biology. Prior to joining IDM, Caitlin worked on a team at Entelos that built a novel model of atherosclerosis in mouse, paired with an analogous model of cardiovascular disease in human, which improved the design of pre-clinical experiments and identified key indicators for translating results from mouse to human. Caitlin was on assignment in Switzerland for a year and a half as a consultant for Entelos, after which she worked with the malaria modeling group at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute. In her role there, she developed new methods for spatial modeling of entomological inoculation rates and co-wrote a WHO report on how country-specific considerations contribute to the impact of malaria vaccines. As a member of IDM’s research team, Caitlin leads the projects on malaria vaccines and human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) with a focus on disease eradication.

Biography

Caitlin Bever has a Ph.D. in Biological Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), along with a Bachelor’s degree (B.Sc.) with Combined Honors in Physics and Astronomy from the University of British Columbia (UBC). Caitlin received a Medtronic Fellowship for her post-graduate work at MIT and the Rudy Haering Medal for outstanding graduating physics student from UBC. Her academic research focused on understanding how to select useful predictions from uncertain mathematical models of biology. Prior to joining IDM, Caitlin worked on a team at Entelos that built a novel model of atherosclerosis in mouse, paired with an analogous model of cardiovascular disease in human, which improved the design of pre-clinical experiments and identified key indicators for translating results from mouse to human. Caitlin was on assignment in Switzerland for a year and a half as a consultant for Entelos, after which she worked with the malaria modeling group at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute. In her role there, she developed new methods for spatial modeling of entomological inoculation rates and co-wrote a WHO report on how country-specific considerations contribute to the impact of malaria vaccines. As a member of IDM’s research team, Caitlin leads the projects on malaria vaccines and human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) with a focus on disease eradication.

Publications

Friday, June 1, 2018
Four mathematical models of gambiense sleeping sickness find that vector control would yield elimination more quickly than improved active or passive screening.
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Monday, June 12, 2017

​A household-level model of malaria transmission is developed to understand the role of reactive case detection in malaria elimination in diverse transmission settings.

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Wednesday, November 23, 2016

​In the Lake Kariba region of Zambia, villages with high and low malaria burden are interconnected, making elimination potentially very challenging.

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Thursday, January 14, 2016
Presumptively administering antimalarial drugs to whole populations will effectively clear infection but can lead to overtreatment.
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Thursday, November 5, 2015
The purpose of this study was to assess the public health impact and cost-effectiveness of routine use of the RTS,S/AS01 vaccine in Africa.
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Friday, July 3, 2015

In a longitudinal malaria research study, we found that low-density infections were common and primarily contribute to onward malaria transmission in a high and seasonal transmission setting.

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Thursday, May 14, 2015

Since the original Ross–Macdonald formulations of vector-borne disease transmission, there has been a broad proliferation of mathematical models of vector-borne disease,

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Thursday, December 11, 2014

Mathematical models are a helpful tool for testing assumptions and elucidating the quantitative implications of disease features.

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