Anna Bershteyn

Sr. Research Manager

Anna Bershteyn

Sr. Research Manager


Anna Bershteyn is a Sr. Research Manager of the HIV/TB center at the Institute for Disease Modeling, and an Affiliate Assistant Professor of Global Health at the University of Washington. She has a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she studied lipid self-assembly at nanoparticle surfaces as a biomimetic approach to vaccine development. Her modeling research focuses on HIV transmission dynamics and impact evaluation of biomedical and programmatic improvements to HIV care and prevention.

Biography

Anna Bershteyn is a Sr. Research Manager of the HIV/TB center at the Institute for Disease Modeling, and an Affiliate Assistant Professor of Global Health at the University of Washington. She has a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she studied lipid self-assembly at nanoparticle surfaces as a biomimetic approach to vaccine development. Her modeling research focuses on HIV transmission dynamics and impact evaluation of biomedical and programmatic improvements to HIV care and prevention.

Publications

Monday, November 13, 2017
Ultimately, even strategies that successfully meet or exceed the 90–90–90 targets will leave up to 27% of people living with HIV/AIDS virally non-suppressed.
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Thursday, June 15, 2017

​Age of sexual partner is a major risk factor for HIV acquisition in both men and women, independent of one’s own age.​

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Monday, January 2, 2017
The VMMC program for HIV prevention has proven successful in reaching a large population of uncircumcised men in western Kenya, but as of 2014, pockets of low circumcision coverage still existed.​​
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Tuesday, April 5, 2016
Could future generations could be protected from HIV using a prevention "age fence," analogous to the ring-fencing strategies used to control the spread of smallpox?
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Thursday, October 1, 2015
Mathematical models are widely used to simulate the effects of interventions to control HIV and to project future epidemiological trends and resource needs.
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Monday, July 20, 2015

The South African government is currently discussing various alternative approaches to the further expansion of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in public-sector facilities.

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Thursday, July 2, 2015

Migrant populations such as mine workers contributed to the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Thursday, July 24, 2014

Evidence that antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV infectiousness, suggests that increasing the number of HIV-positive adults who are on treatment could have the potential to change the course of the

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Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Recent scientific findings have demonstrated the efficacy and effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for preventing transmission in heterosexual partnerships.

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Wednesday, August 28, 2013

The difficulty of choosing a strategy for allocating transmission-blocking interventions stems from an incomplete picture of the epidemiological drivers of generalized HIV epidemics, such as the ep

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Monday, February 4, 2013

Mathematical models of ART and PrEP have been used to assess the risk of drug resistance on the individual and population level.

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Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Mathematical modelling is used to investigate the potential impact of treatment on HIV incidence but substantial uncertainties will remain because information on all the factors that could influenc

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Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Several mathematical models that simulate HIV infection and disease progression have been developed to investigate the impact of expanding access to ART on the incidence of HIV (the number of new i

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Sunday, June 17, 2012

The EMOD model for HIV was compared to several other HIV models in an article by Eaton et al. published in PLoS Medicine.

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