Joel Miller

Sr. Research Scientist

Joel Miller

Sr. Research Scientist


Joel Miller is a Mathematical Modeler focused on the dynamic behavior of complex systems of interacting agents. Much of his work has focused on the spread of diseases through contact networks, with a recent emphasis on deriving low-dimensional models for disease spread in a population in which partnerships are neither permanent nor fleeting. He is a Hertz Fellow. His PhD at Cambridge University in fluid dynamics was awarded the “Vernon Harrison” award from the British Society of Rheology for the top (UK) thesis in the field of rheology. He switched his focus to infectious disease spread during postdocs at Los Alamos, the University of British Columbia CDC, and a joint postdoc with the Harvard School of Public Health and Fogarty International Center. He has held faculty positions at Penn State University and Monash University (in Melbourne). He joined the applied mathematics group at IDM in March of 2016.

Biography

Joel Miller is a Mathematical Modeler focused on the dynamic behavior of complex systems of interacting agents. Much of his work has focused on the spread of diseases through contact networks, with a recent emphasis on deriving low-dimensional models for disease spread in a population in which partnerships are neither permanent nor fleeting. He is a Hertz Fellow. His PhD at Cambridge University in fluid dynamics was awarded the “Vernon Harrison” award from the British Society of Rheology for the top (UK) thesis in the field of rheology. He switched his focus to infectious disease spread during postdocs at Los Alamos, the University of British Columbia CDC, and a joint postdoc with the Harvard School of Public Health and Fogarty International Center. He has held faculty positions at Penn State University and Monash University (in Melbourne). He joined the applied mathematics group at IDM in March of 2016.

Publications

Thursday, July 6, 2017
​Explores relations between​ mean field models for non-Markovian epidemics in networks.​
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Wednesday, January 11, 2017
​In this paper, we develop low-dimensional models for how an SIR disease will spread if it transmits through a sexual contact network and some other transmission mechanism, such as direct contact or v
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Monday, September 19, 2016
Percolation is widely used to study spreading processes on networks. A number of generalized versions of percolation have been introduced.
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