Ben Althouse

Sr Research Scientist

Ben Althouse

Sr Research Scientist


Ben Althouse is a member of the epidemiology team at IDM where he explores pneumococcal pneumonia vaccines, the transmission dynamics of respiratory pathogens, and the role of complex human contact structures on disease transmission. He was an Omidyar Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute, holds a PhD in Epidemiology and a Master of Science in Biostatistics from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health where he was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, and holds Bachelor of Science degrees in Mathematics and Biochemistry from the University of Washington. His previous work has included mathematical modeling of sylvatic dengue virus transmission in nonhuman primates in Senegal, examining the role of antimicrobial use on the evolution of drug resistance, using Twitter as a model system of co-infection dynamics, and using novel data sources (such as Google searches, Twitter, and Wikipedia article views) for population-level surveillance of infectious and chronic diseases. Ben is an Affiliate Faculty member in the Department of Biology at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, and an Affiliate Assistant Professor at the Information School at UW.

Biography

Ben Althouse is a member of the epidemiology team at IDM where he explores pneumococcal pneumonia vaccines, the transmission dynamics of respiratory pathogens, and the role of complex human contact structures on disease transmission. He was an Omidyar Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute, holds a PhD in Epidemiology and a Master of Science in Biostatistics from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health where he was awarded an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship, and holds Bachelor of Science degrees in Mathematics and Biochemistry from the University of Washington. His previous work has included mathematical modeling of sylvatic dengue virus transmission in nonhuman primates in Senegal, examining the role of antimicrobial use on the evolution of drug resistance, using Twitter as a model system of co-infection dynamics, and using novel data sources (such as Google searches, Twitter, and Wikipedia article views) for population-level surveillance of infectious and chronic diseases. Ben is an Affiliate Faculty member in the Department of Biology at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, and an Affiliate Assistant Professor at the Information School at UW.

Publications

Tuesday, August 29, 2017
We identified sources of Streptococcus Pneumoniae (SP) acquisitions in Navajo Nation and the White Mountain Apache American Indian Tribes, and found toddlers and older children to be key drivers in SP
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Monday, March 28, 2016
Can a priming dose of the whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccine in the current vaccination schedule cost-effectively reduce pertussis incidence?
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Friday, October 16, 2015
Novel data streams (NDS), such as web search data or social media updates, hold promise for enhancing the capabilities of public health surveillance.
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Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Many countries have seen a startling increase in the incidence of Bordetella pertussis, an important causative agent of whooping cough, over the past 20 years.
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