Andre Lin Ouedraogo

Resident Scholar

Andre Lin Ouedraogo

Resident Scholar


André Lin has a PhD in Medical Sciences from the Radboud University Medical Centre, Netherlands, along with a Master’s degree and a PhD in Applied Biology from the University of Ouagadougou. He was also awarded a graduate scholarship in Biology Engineering from the University of Sciences and Technology in Algiers where his interest lay in the biological and anti-bacterial properties of a cobalt-60’s sterile irradiated amniotic membrane tissue. As a doctoral candidate, André Lin used sensitive molecular tools and first quantified the full extent of the human reservoir for gametocytes. Prior to joining IDM, André Lin was Principal Investigator of epidemiological and clinical studies at CNRFP, Ouagadougou. His work contributed novel and highly relevant findings about malaria low-density infections and immunity to accurately understand the composition and dynamics of the infectious reservoir to facilitate current and future malaria control and elimination efforts. He also acted as temporary advisor for WHO. As part of the research team at IDM, André works to identify and organize input data in order to refine and apply models to conduct sensitivity analyses as well as explore trade-offs among multiple interventions. His concentration is optimizing disease eradication plans for time, cost, and robustness and developing novel diagnostic techniques in support of elimination and eradication of malaria.

Biography

André Lin has a PhD in Medical Sciences from the Radboud University Medical Centre, Netherlands, along with a Master’s degree and a PhD in Applied Biology from the University of Ouagadougou. He was also awarded a graduate scholarship in Biology Engineering from the University of Sciences and Technology in Algiers where his interest lay in the biological and anti-bacterial properties of a cobalt-60’s sterile irradiated amniotic membrane tissue. As a doctoral candidate, André Lin used sensitive molecular tools and first quantified the full extent of the human reservoir for gametocytes. Prior to joining IDM, André Lin was Principal Investigator of epidemiological and clinical studies at CNRFP, Ouagadougou. His work contributed novel and highly relevant findings about malaria low-density infections and immunity to accurately understand the composition and dynamics of the infectious reservoir to facilitate current and future malaria control and elimination efforts. He also acted as temporary advisor for WHO. As part of the research team at IDM, André works to identify and organize input data in order to refine and apply models to conduct sensitivity analyses as well as explore trade-offs among multiple interventions. His concentration is optimizing disease eradication plans for time, cost, and robustness and developing novel diagnostic techniques in support of elimination and eradication of malaria.

Publications

Friday, July 6, 2018
Here we describe the process and advantages of a multi-disease framework approach developed with formal software support.
Read online
Wednesday, May 16, 2018
We fitted movement models to trip data from surveys conducted at 3–5 sites throughout each of Mali, Burkina Faso, Zambia and Tanzania.
Read online
Wednesday, May 9, 2018
We assess the impact of naturally acquired anti-gametocyte antibodies on malaria transmission to mosquitoes and on the age-dependent composition of the infectious reservoir and seasonal dynamics.
Read online
Thursday, February 8, 2018
This study demonstrates that host antibody responses to gametocyte proteins are associated with reduced malaria transmission efficiency from humans to mosquitoes.
Read online
Tuesday, April 12, 2016
Humans travel to and from various malaria transmission settings and contribute to malaria parasite dispersal.
Read online
Wednesday, December 2, 2015
Estimates of parasite density-related contributions to the infectious reservoir show that improving malaria diagnostics 100-fold in mass treatment programs can interrupt transmission in high-endemic s
Read online
Friday, July 3, 2015

In a longitudinal malaria research study, we found that low-density infections were common and primarily contribute to onward malaria transmission in a high and seasonal transmission setting.

Read online
Wednesday, June 3, 2015
Individuals with subpatent infections form a substantial portion of the infectious reservoir of malaria at all transmission intensities.
Read online